DR. ALANNA O’BROIN PHD CPSYCHOL, PRODUCTIVE LIVING LIMITED, UK

DR. ALANNA O’BROIN PHD CPSYCHOL, PRODUCTIVE LIVING LIMITED, UK

 

Coaching and therapeutic relationships:  How do similarities and differences matter in practice

As part of the impetus for investigating the ‘active ingredients’ of coaching (De Haan et al., 2016), the ongoing debate on the functional similarity of coaching and therapy has extended to include the question of the coaching and therapeutic relationships (McKenna & Davis, 2009; O’Broin, 2016).

How do the relationships in these allied helping domains overlap and differ, and what are the implications for their respective processes and outcomes?

This paper addresses this question, arguing that both similarities and differences, including the attitudes of both participants in the dyad, and the practitioner’s use of self and skills exist, and play a meaningful part in creating and maintaining individual coaching and therapeutic relationships respectively.  Implications for research, and for practice at the general and specific levels are discussed which are relevant for those practitioners working with either coachee or therapy clients, and those who work in both domains.

References

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De Haan, E., Bertie, C., Day, A. & Sills, C. (2010). Critical incidents of clients and coaches: A direct-comparison study. International Coaching Psychology Review, 5(2), 109.128.

De Haan, E., Grant, A. M., Burger, Y., & Eriksson, P.O. (2016). A large scale study of executive and workplace coaching: The relative contributions of relationship, personality match, and self-efficacy. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 68(3), 189-207.

De Haan, E. & Gannon, J. (2016). The Coaching Relationship. In T. Bachkirova, G. Spence & D. Drake (eds.), The Sage Handbook of Coaching. London: Sage.

Gessnitzer, S. & Kauffeld, S. (2015). The Working Alliance in Coaching: Why behaviour is the key to success. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 51(2), 177-197.

Grant, A. M. (2014). Autonomy support, relationship satisfaction and goal focus in the coach-coachee relationship: which best predicts coaching success? Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 7(1), 18-38.

Ianiro, P. M., Schermuly, C. C. & Kauffeld, S. (2013). Why interpersonal dominance and affiliation matter: An Interaction analysis of the coach-client relationship. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 6(1), 25-46.

Ianiro, P. M. & Kauffeld, S. (2014). Take care what you bring with you: How coaches’ mood and interpersonal behaviour affect coaching success. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 66(3), 231-257.

McKenna, D. D. & Davis, S. L. (2009). Hidden in plain sight: The active ingredients of executive coaching. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 2(3), 244-260.

O’Broin, A. (2015). The therapeutic relationship. In S. Palmer (ed.), Introduction to Counselling and Psychotherapy. London: Sage.

O’Broin, A. (2016).  Where we have been, where we are now, and where we might be heading: Where next for the coaching relationship? In O.M. Spaten and A. O’Broin (eds.), The Coaching Relationship – and beyond. Aalborg: Aalborg University Library.

O’Broin, A. & Palmer, S. (2010a). Introducing an interpersonal perspective on the coaching relationship. In S. Palmer and A. McDowall (eds.), The Coaching relationship: Putting People First. London: Routledge.

O’Broin, A. & Palmer, S. (2010b). Building on an interpersonal perspective on the coaching relationship. In S. Palmer and A. McDowall (eds.), The Coaching relationship: Putting People First. London: Routledge.

O’Broin, A. & Palmer, S. (2010c). Exploring key aspects in the formation of coaching relationships: Initial indicators from the perspective of the coachee and the coach. Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 3(3), 124-143.

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Biography DR ALANNA O’BROIN PHD CPSYCHOL AFBPsS MISCP ACCRED

Alanna is a Chartered Psychologist, an Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society, and an International Society for Coaching Psychology Accredited Coaching Psychologist.

Previously an investment analyst and Fund Manager for leading international Investment manager 3i Group, Alanna is an experienced practicing coaching psychologist, working primarily with executives in achieving their developmental and performance goals.

Her doctoral research was on coachee and coach experiences of forming the coaching relationship and how the coach may adapt to the coachee.  She has written 8 peer reviewed articles, and authored and co-authored 8 book and e-book chapters, mainly on the topic of the coaching relationship.  Additional research interests include the boundaries of coaching and allied domains such as therapy; integrative coaching approaches, and cognitive behavioural approaches in coaching.

Alanna was Co-Editor of Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice until January 2016, is a Consulting Editor of The Coaching Psychologist, and a member of the Editorial Board of the Annual Review of High Performance Coaching and Consulting.